Laura's Lineal and Collateral Ascent



George W Clarke

Male 1812 - 1880  (68 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name George W Clarke  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
    Born 22 Feb 1812  Washington, D. C. Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4, 5, 6, 7
    Gender Male 
    Residence 1850  Van Buren, Crawford, Arkansas Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Residence 1855  Kansas Territory Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    District 2; Page 77 
    Residence 1860  Fayetteville, Washington, Arkansas, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Residence 1860  Philadelphia Ward 2, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Died 19 Dec 1880  Mexico Find all individuals with events at this location  [6, 8
    • Age: 68
    Buried Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Person ID I1557  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 24 Aug 2017 

    Family ID F798  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Malvina Deluren Doak,   b. Abt 1827, Mississippi Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1864, Bexar County, Texas Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 37 years) 
    Married 22 Jun 1844  Boonsboro, Arkansas Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Notes 
    • MARRIED,
      By the Rev. Samuel Harris, at Boonsboro, Ark's on the 22d ult., Mr. Geo. W. Clarke, Editor of the Van Buren Intelligencer, to Miss Malvina Doak, daughter of Josiah S. Doak, recently of Holly Springs, Mississippi.
      Info from the Arkansas Gazette posted online by Pris Weathers at www.arkansasties.com
    Children 
     1. Joseph Mastella Clarke,   b. 1847, Arkansas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1899  (Age 52 years)  [natural]
     2. Elizabeth Renetta Clarke,   b. Abt 1849, Arkansas Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     3. William Clarke,   b. Abt 1852, Arkansas Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     4. Perkins Clarke,   b. Abt 1854, Arkansas Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     5. Georgie Clarke,   b. 9 Apr 1858, Fort Scott, Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Mar 1943, Los Angeles, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)  [natural]
     6. Cora Anne "Dixie" Clarke,   b. 1862, Arkansas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Jun 1928, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 24 Aug 2017 
    Family ID F615  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 22 Feb 1812 - Washington, D. C. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 22 Jun 1844 - Boonsboro, Arkansas Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1850 - Van Buren, Crawford, Arkansas Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1860 - Fayetteville, Washington, Arkansas, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1860 - Philadelphia Ward 2, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 19 Dec 1880 - Mexico Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • George W. Clarke witnessed the signing of the TREATY WITH THE CREEKS AND SEMINOLE, 1845. Jan. 4, 1845

      ---------------------------------------------

      The following is taken from the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program site talking about the
      CLARKE-HARRELL-BURSON HOUSE in VAN BUREN, CRAWFORD COUNTY, Arkansas.

      http://www.arkansaspreservation.com/historic-properties/_search_nomination_popup.aspx?id=1311

      George Washington Clarke was born in the District of Columbia in 1812. At age twenty, he came to Arkansas and became an associate editor of the Van Buren, Arkansas Intelligencer in July 1843. The Arkansas Intelligencer was the first newspaper in Arkansas to be published west of Little Rock. It was established by Francis M. Van Horne and Thomas Sterne with the first copy being issued on January 22, 1842. In March of 1844 Clarke became the sole proprietor and editor of the paper. Previously, the Intelligencer had been politically neutral, but under Clarke's control the newspaper advocated the Democratic party's political philosophy. Thomas Sterne responded to this political change in his old paper by founding the Western Frontier Whig in May of 1844. A heated editorial war ensued between Clarke and Sterne's partner and chief editor, John S. Logan.

      In addition to their political differences, the two rival editors' personalities were likewise at different poles. Clarke was described as being brilliant, impulsive, and forceful, whereas Logan was seen as calm, imperturbable, and self- possessed. The personality dissimilarity coupled with an intense political rivalry eventually culminated in an incident described by Judge Jesse Turner, which went beyond simple editorial bashing. Clarke initiated the conflict by referring to Logan as "Big Mush," the name of a certain comical Indian chief. Logan responded by labeling Clarke with the equally devastating insult of "Toady." The Rubicon had been crossed and honor could now only be satisfied with blood. A duel with rifles at sixty paces was decided upon. Two shots were exchanged on the "field of honor" near Fort Smith, but the smell of powder and bad marksmanship led to a rather sudden reconciliation.

      The bitter editorial war was soon over as the Western Frontier Whig moved to Victoria, Texas sometime in 1845. Also, in April of 1845 Clarke left the Intelligencer for two years. He resumed ownership on March 21, 1847 and continued his editorial duties until 1853 when he received an appointment as Indian Agent for the Pottowatomie Indians in the Kansas Territory. Besides being an editor, Clarke was elected to the Arkansas State Senate in 1850. It was in the Senate that he first took an active interest in the affairs of the Indian Territories. Although the biography of the irrepressible Clarke extends until December 19, 1880, only the ten-year period from 1843 to 1853 is relevant for the purposes of this nomination. Despite the lack of conclusive records, one can assume that Clarke resided in his frame house in Logtown throughout his Intelligencer years up until his Indian Agent appointment.

      see http://www.kancoll.org/books/gihon/g_chap11.htm regarding the killing of Thomas Barber by George W. Clarke

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      from The War in Kansas.: A rough trip to the border, among new homes and a strange people by George Douglas Brewerton:
      Doctor Johnson's letter, of which the Major very kindly permitted us to make a copy, reads as follows;
      HOUSE ON THE PRAIRIE, KANSAS TERRITORY, December 80, 1855.
      DEAR MAJOR: Rufus, the bearer of this letter, will inform you that matters are fast coming to a desperate conclusion with us-a crisis which requires both prompt and energetic action is approaching. Your family are not safe here even for a single night. Your house is watched as though it were a den of thieves. Your dog has disappeared; we presume he has been decoyed away and killed to prevent his giving an alarm. One of your carriage horses has been poisoned, and, in addition to this, an attempt was made to fire your house. This occurred last night, between twelve and one o'clock A.M. It was fortunate that we discovered the fire before it was too late; we were but just in time to save the building. Had it been otherwise, God only knows what would have become of your family; for, even supposing that they had escaped the flames, they would have been exposed to the danger of perishing in the bitter cold of this inclement season, ere they could have reached the nearest neighbor's house. (Major Clarke's residence is three-quarters of a mile from any house, and the mercury at the time stood at twenty degrees below zero, and it would have been almost a miracle, under such circumstances, if they had escaped freezing.) But to come to the point: you cannot live here; it is risking too much; the very existence of your family is at stake; your own life is in imminent danger; you would not be safe here-no, not for a single day. If you were here it would only aggravate the evil. For God's sake, remove your family. Take them to Missouri, or up among the Pottawatomie Indians. They would be safe there. Your property, too, is in imminent danger. Every day brings the intelligence of some new act of outrage-houseburnings, brutal threatenings, and attempted assassinations. How can we go on living thus, in God's name? Is there no law in Kansas? To whom are we to look for aid? How is all this to end? Are our lives to be menaced -is our property to be destroyed-and are women and children to be driven from their desolated homes, without the upraising of an arm to stay the perpetrators of these acts of lawless violence? Is there no power vested in our Governor-no protection to be obtained from the Executive? Or must the law-abiding citizens of Kansas be driven into the terrible alternative of defending, by Lynch law and armed violence, their homes and firesides? If we have laws why are they not enforced? Something must be done for our relief, and that speedily.

      The foregoing is all which would be interesting to the reader. It is written by Dr. George W. Johnson, who is- as we have elsewhere stated-a son of Governor Johnson of Virginia. A postscript from William H. Doak, Esq., a brother-in-law of Major Clarke's-the bearer of the documents being named Rufus-endorses and corroborates the foregoing statements, and adds that they are going to get some of their neighbors to assist in defending Major Clarke's house until arrangements can be made for the removal of his family. The letter from Mrs. Clarke is of similar import. Major Clarke's residence is at present occupied by two families-this has been the case since the breaking out of the Kansas troubles. Among its inmates may be numbered two females and five small children. Had they been left houseless, on the bitter night of December thirtieth, to find their way through the frozen snow to the nearest dwelling (three-quarters of a mile distant), it is most probable that some of these little ones would have fallen victims to the terrible state of things which now exists in some sections of Kansas.

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      from Kansas Historical Society; http://www.kshs.org/kansapedia/cool-things-proslavery-leader-s-desk/10309

      George W. Clarke was a notorious proslavery leader during the Bleeding Kansas era, when forces sought control over the state based on the issue of slavery. Clarke had been suspected of killing a free-state man, Thomas Barber, near Lawrence in 1855 but was never convicted. The following year, Clarke led a party of 400 Missourians into Linn County on the eastern edge of the state, where, in the words of a fellow proslavery man, they "plundered, robbed and burned out of house and home nearly every Free-state family in Linn County, while [Clarke's] hands were steeped in innocent blood, and the light of burning buildings marked his course."
      A Shot in the Dark
      While Clarke sat reading by the desk at his home near Lecompton in 1856, someone--presumably a free-stater--shot at him. Clarke was uninjured but the desk did not fare as well. The bullet passed through the front of the desk and left a divot in the surface of the drawer directly behind it. The hole left by the bullet can be seen in the image of the closed desk as the dark spot below the keyhole and near left-center.
      Clarke began working in the U. S. Land office in Fort Scott in 1857. Many years later, Judge William Margrave gave the following account of Clarke during this period:
      "[He] was practically registrar of the land office but there was a story afloat, and I guess it was true, that he had killed somebody up near Lecompton and the government wouldn't appoint him directly but appointed somebody else [Wm. H. Doak, Clarke's brother-in-law] and Clarke performed the duties. . . . [Clarke] was a border ruffian of the worst kind. If he wasn't killed before he got away from Kansas it was a mistake on the part of the people who knew him."
      Clarke continued his proslavery activities in Fort Scott and nearby Missouri until he was finally driven out of the state and into southwestern Missouri in August, 1858.

      ------------------------------------------------------

      Mexico City National Cemetery Interments - Dated 20 April 1984
      Records obtained from Paul Badgley, Superintendent of the Mexico City National Cemetery
      Format: Marker#, Name, Location, Age/Birth, Death, Remarks
      277, CLARK, George W, Loc: W 4 4 5, 22 Feb 1812, 19 Dec 1880, Major Heart Disease, Founder of newspaper Dos Republicas, US

      ---------------------------------------------------

      Death Notices From THE MONTGOMERY DAILY ADVERTISER
      Transcribed by Larry E. Caver, Jr.

      January 8, 1881:

      Major George W. CLARKE, editor and proprietor of the Two Republics, an
      American newspaper published in the city of Mexico, died December 19th, in Mexico.
      For many years he owned and edited the Intelligencer, at Van Buren, Crawford
      County, Arkansas. He joined the Confederate Army at the beginning of the war,
      and at its close emigrated to Mexico…

  • Sources 
    1. [S18] 1850 Crawford County, Arkansas census.
      Van Buren Township,

    2. [S48] 1860 Washington County, Arkansas census.
      Fayetteville, Page No. 151

    3. [S732] 1860 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2009;), Year: 1860; Census Place: Fayetteville, Washington, Arkansas; Roll: ; Page: 625; Image: 151.
      Birth date: abt 1815 Birth place: Colombia Residence date: 1860 Residence place: Fayetteville, Washington, Arkansas, United States

    4. [S732] 1860 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2009;), Year: 1860; Census Place: Philadelphia Ward 2, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Roll: ; Page: 355; Image: 361.
      Birth date: abt 1814 Birth place: District of Columbia Residence date: 1860 Residence place: Philadelphia Ward 2, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

    5. [S285] 1850 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2009;), Year: 1850; Census Place: Van Buren, Crawford, Arkansas; Roll: M432_25; Page: 353A; Image: .
      Birth date: abt 1812 Birth place: District of Columbia Residence date: 1850 Residence place: Van Buren, Crawford, Arkansas

    6. [S462] Web: International, Find A Grave Index, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2013;).

    7. [S542] Kansas Territorial Census, 1855, Graden, Debra, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 1999;).

    8. [S271] THE MONTGOMERY DAILY ADVERTISER.
      Death Notices From THE MONTGOMERY DAILY ADVERTISER (January 8, 1881)
      Transcribed by Larry E. Caver, Jr.
      http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/ALAUTAUG/2004-04/1081462411

    9. [S189] Arkansas Gazette.
      July 17, 1844 - Marriage Announcements


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